Aperture Cinema - Winston-Salem
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311 west fourth st.winston salem nc          tel. 336-722-8148
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ongoing series


 

NIGHT SHIFT


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old or new, classy or cult, scary or camp- films to stay up late for...

All tickets just $7!
mean girls film stillMEAN GIRLS
Friday, May 2 @ 10:30pm
Saturday, May 3 @ 10:30pm
Sunday, May 4 @ 9pm
Cady Heron (Lindsay Lohan) is a 15-year-old girl who has spent most of her life in Africa, where she was home-schooled by her zoologist parents. When her family relocates to the United States, Cady finds herself attending a high school in suburban Illinois, where she gets a crash course in the various sub-strata of the student body: the jocks, the cheerleaders, the stoners, the "cool" kids, and so on. Much to her surprise, Cady finds herself embraced by a clique of rich and popular girls known to outsiders as "the Plastics," led by Regina George (Rachel McAdams), Gretchen Weiners (Lacey Chabert), and Karen Smith (Amanda Seyfried). While Cady is grateful for her new friends, it doesn't take long for her to realize how manipulative they can be, and she soon discovers she's violated an unwritten law when she goes out on a date with Aaron (Jonathan Bennett), who is charming, good looking...and Regina's former boyfriend. It isn't long before Regina and her pals are on the warpath, and Cady must face a level of vengeful behavior for which years in the jungle never prepared her.

dazed and confused film stillDAZED AND CONFUSED
Friday, May 16 @ 10:30pm
Saturday, May 17 @ 10:30pm
Sunday, May 18 @ 9:00pm
Like George Lucas' American Graffiti, Richard Linklater's Dazed and Confused is an affectionate look at the youth culture of a bygone era. While Lucas took aim at the conservative 1950's, Linklater jumps ahead a generation to the bicentennial year of 1976 to celebrate the joys of beer blasts, pot smoking and Frampton Comes Alive. Set on the last day of the academic year, the film follows the random activities of a sprawling group of Texas high schoolers as they celebrate the arrival of summer, their paths variously intersecting at a freshmen hazing, a local pool parlor and finally at a keg party.


cant hardly wait film stillCAN'T HARDLY WAIT
Friday, May 30 @ 10:30pm
Saturday, May 31 @ 10:30pm
Sunday, June 1 @ 9:00pm
After the Huntington Hills High graduation ceremony, the fun gets underway at the graduation party where an assortment of jocks, geeks, prom queens, bimbos, headbangers, and nerdy misfits unload four years' worth of emotional baggage at a house where the hostess (Michelle Brookhurst) loses control of her guests. Writer wannabe Preston Meyers (Ethan Embry) has been in love with Amanda (Jennifer Love Hewitt of Party of Five) since the first time he saw her during their freshman year. His tormented infatuation with Amanda has intensified throughout high school and culminates at the party, where Preston must now seize this final opportunity to proclaim his love for her before he leaves the next day for Boston. Preston decides to make his move at some point during the party, a particularly auspicious occasion since Amanda has just been dumped by her super-jock boyfriend, Mike Dexter (Peter Facinelli), who wanted freedom to pursue his testosterone-charged fantasies with college women. Cringing at this ludicrous love triangle is Preston's introverted pal and confidante, Denise Fleming (Lauren Ambrose). When Denise runs into her ex-childhood friend Kenny (Seth Green), the two begin sexual experimentation behind the closed bathroom door. Geeky science-fiction fan William Lichter (Charlie Korsmo) devises a plan to ruin Mike's stud reputation and publicly humiliate him and his meathead buddies -- sweet revenge for four years of agony. Former Huntington Hills graduate Trip McNieley (Jerry O'Connell) tells Mike about the terror awaiting in college where "Guys like us are a dime a dozen." Yearbook Girl (Melissa Joan Hart of Sabrina, the Teenage Witch) wants everyone to sign her cherished volume of memories as the partying teens attempt to move into the uncertain future.

KIDS AT HEART


Kids at Heart for Web1 copy  
Kids at Heart is a/perture’s family-friendly film series, and a great opportunity for parents to share some of the films they themselves enjoyed as children with a new generation of film-goers.  Kids love these films (and are okay with Mom and Dad tagging along for the fun)! Kids at Heart features films rated G or PG, and we’ll be featuring content information for each film on our website (so parents can determine the age group best suited for each screening).  Parents and grandparents can enjoy this series too- we’ll be featuring both classic family films and newer titles, so there’s something for everyone!
We've also included advisory content information below (courtesy of Common Sense Media), so parents can determine what age is best suited to each film!

Screening times:

Fridays- 1:45pm and 4:00pm (1:45pm is a sensory-friendly screening for parents/younger children; tickets cannot be purchased online, and seating is limited, so be sure to arrive early)
Saturdays- 10:00am
Sundays- 10:00am and 2:00pm

Film Schedule:

ernest and celestine still2April 25-27: ERNEST & CELESTINE (rated PG, 80 mins.)
Deep below snowy, cobblestone streets, tucked away in networks of winding subterranean tunnels, lives a civilization of hardworking mice, terrified of the bears who live above ground. Unlike her fellow mice, Celestine is an artist and a dreamer - and when she nearly ends up as breakfast for ursine troubadour Ernest, the two form an unlikely bond. But it isn't long before their friendship is put on trial by their respective bear-fearing and mice-eating communities. Fresh from standing ovations at Cannes and Toronto Ernest & Celestine joyfully leaps across genres and influences to capture the kinetic, limitless possibilities of animated storytelling. Like a gorgeous watercolor painting brought to life, a constantly shifting pastel color palette bursts and drips across the screen, while wonderful storytelling and brilliant comic timing draw up influences as varied as Buster Keaton, Bugs Bunny and the outlaw romanticism of Bonnie and Clyde. Bringing it all together is the on-screen chemistry between the two lead characters - a flowing, tender and playful rapport that will put a smile on your face and make your heart glow.
Parents need to know that Ernest & Celestine is a lovely hand-drawn French animated movie about the unlikely friendship between a mouse and a bear. Dubbed in English, the critically acclaimed Oscar-nominated film is the story of finding friendship where you least expect it and defending that friendship against discrimination and prejudice. There is some occasional insult language ("dumb," "moron") and a few scary moments when the two pals are being followed and then put on trial -- as well as a frightening bedtime story about mice-eating bears. A fire nearly kills a few characters, but they're saved at the last minute.

e.t. film still1May 9-11: E.T. (rated PG, 114 mins.)
Henry Thomas plays Elliott, a young boy living with his single mother (Dee Wallace), his older brother Michael (Robert MacNaughton), and his younger sister Gertie (Drew Barrymore). Elliott often seems lonely and out of sorts, lost in his own world. One day, while looking for something in the back yard, he senses something mysterious in the woods watching him. And he's right: an alien spacecraft on a scientific mission mistakenly left behind an aging botanist who isn't sure how to get home. Eventually Elliott puts his fears aside and makes contact with the "little squashy guy," perhaps the least threatening alien invader ever to hit a movie screen. As Elliott tries to keep the alien under wraps and help him figure out a way to get home, he discovers that the creature can communicate with him telepathically. Soon they begin to learn from each other, and Elliott becomes braver and less threatened by life. E.T. rigs up a communication device from junk he finds around the house, but no one knows if he'll be rescued before a group of government scientists gets hold of him.
Parents need to know that Steven Spielberg's classic has some scenes of mild peril that may be too intense for younger children. For example, E.T. looks like he has died in one scene. There is brief but strong language by today's standards for a PG movie (like"bitch" and "s--t"). E.T. contains one of the most memorable product placements ever, Reese's Pieces, as well as a scene in which Elliott feels slightly drunk, because E.T. has indulged in a beer. Families should also be aware of the fact that the movie was criticized for having a complete absence of non-white characters.

Black Stallion Still1May 23-25: THE BLACK STALLION (rated G, 120 mins.)
This beautifully mounted adaptation of Walter Farley's story for children tells the tale of Alec (Kelly Reno), a young boy touring the world with his adventurous salesman father (Hoyt Axton). While travelling back to the United States by ship, Alec discovers a wild, beautiful Arabian stallion being brought along in the cargo hold. When disaster strikes at sea, the ship sinks, and Alec and the stallion are the only survivors. Alone together on a nearby island, the boy and the horse develop a relationship; wary of each other at first, they learn to trust each other, and they become close friends. When a rescue party finally finds Alec, he refuses to leave the island without the stallion, and the horse goes with Alec to the small town that is his home. Alec's mother (Teri Garr) is at a loss about what to do with this remarkable but difficult animal. Henry Dailey (Mickey Rooney), an elderly horse trainer who lives in the neighborhood, senses a special connection between the boy and his horse; he's soon convinced that with the right training, and the boy as his jockey, the horse could be a champion on the race course.
Parents need to know that Pauline Kael said this "may be the greatest children's movie ever made." Although the movie is rated G, the shipwreck is very scary and Alec's father is killed.

iron giant film still1June 6-8: THE IRON GIANT (rated PG, 86 mins.)
Set in 1957, The Iron Giant focuses on Hogarth (voice of Eli Marienthal), an imaginative nine-year-old boy who daydreams of alien invasions and doing battle with Communist agents. One day, Hogarth hears a local fisherman talk about something that surpasses anything he could dream up: a fifty-foot robot that fell from the sky into a nearby lake. Needless to say, Hogarth's mom, Annie (voice of Jennifer Aniston) finds this a little hard to swallow, but when Hogarth finds the robot (voice of Vin Diesel) and fishes him out of the water, his pal Dean (voice of Harry Connick Jr.), a beatnik sculptor who also runs a junkyard, offers to help by hiding the robot with his salvage. A government agent named Kent Mansley (voice of Christopher McDonald) soon gets wind that there's a mechanical invader of unknown origins in the neighborhood and wants to wipe out the potential threat. However, the robot (which loves to eat metal and is learning to talk) turns out to be friendly, and the boy in turn tries to teach his new pal the ways of humans..
Parents need to know that this movie provides the commensurate cartoon action that most kids love: a giant robot under attack; buildings, trains, and cars crashing; futuristic weapons firing; Hogarth, the boy hero, creeping through a dark forest looking for “trouble"; a boat caught in a storm; spooky music; and an arrogant, mean-spirited villain who threatens everyone and everything that is important. It also includes a poignant moment when a deer is shot. The filmmakers bring a point of view to the events, hoping to instruct, explain, and furnish thought-provoking ideas through which kids can view the action (i.e. “guns kill,” the collateral damage of paranoia, and taking responsibility for our choices). Set in the 1950s, one character smokes a pipe throughout and one character smokes a cigarette. Hogarth gives the villain a dose of laxative which humorously results in trips to any bathroom he can find.

milo-and-otis still1June 20-22: THE ADVENTURES OF MILO AND OTIS (rated G, 75 mins.)
Milo is a kitten, Otis is a dog. When Milo gets into a small box with the intention of taking a trip down a river, Otis follows. En route, the stars encounter bad weather, life-threatening situations, and even potential mates. Original made for Japanese TV under the title Koneko Monogatari, The Adventures of Milo and Otis contained some intense scenes that were edited out for Western audiences. For American consumption, the film was pared down to a G-rated 75 minutes, with a new comic narration added, written by Mark Saltzman and delivered by Dudley Moore.
Parents need to know that this classic '80s family film is an entertaining, narrated look at how a barn cat and dog befriend each other and are willing to risk everything to help the other survive. Families sensitive to animal rights, however, should know that the movie has since come under scrutiny for having possibly put the various dogs and cats in the film in dangerous situations for the benefit of the plot. The movie should not be mistaken for a documentary, but it does show how dogs and cats deal with other farm and wild animals. There are some frightening situations, especially when Milo and Otis are separated and must face predatory bears, seagulls, and other animals by themselves. In one scene, Milo even jumps off a cliff. The births of a litter of puppies and kittens is also depicted but not in an overly graphic manner. Ultimately, it's a story of an unlikely but unconditional friendship.


american tail still1July 4-6: AN AMERICAN TAIL (rated G, 80 mins.)
An American Tail is a beautifully rendered animated flim that tells an overly familiar story in terms children can easily understand. Fievel Mousekewitz and his family of Russian-Jewish mice escape from their homeland in the late 1800s, boarding a boat headed toward America to evade the Czarist rule of the Russian cats. Fievel, however, is separated from his family upon his arrival in New York City, and he discovers to his horror that there are cats in America too (his father said there weren't). Fievel meets his share of friendly and hostile mice, and he eventually befriends a cat as well..
Parents need to know that the main character in this feel-good animated movie spends much of the film trying to find his parents, who he was separated from during a storm at sea. He faces many perils, including a near-drowning and attacks from monstrous cats, during his journey, which may prove too scary for the youngest viewers.

muppets from space film stillSeptember 12-14: MUPPETS FROM SPACE (rated G, 68 mins.)
At long last, the secret of just what the Great Gonzo happens to be is revealed! As Gonzo and his friend Rizzo hit the road in search of their roots, Gonzo makes a shocking discovery: his parents are actually space aliens from another galaxy. After announcing this startling news on Miss Piggy's talk show (hey, if Ricki Lake and Rosie O'Donnell can do it, why not Miss Piggy?), Gonzo finds himself the subject of a dark and mysterious government conspiracy, led by the nefarious K. Edgar Singer (Jeffrey Tambor). In time, Gonzo is forced to choose: should he hop on board the UFO and sail off to live with his family, or stay on Earth with the friends he knows and loves?.
Parents need to know that Muppets from Space is classic Muppet fare with jokes to keep the parents happy and a fun story for kids, with the valuable theme of an outcast trying to find his place in the world. There are some mildly suspenseful moments and lots of comic action sequences in which some of the beloved Muppet creatures, particularly Gonzo, are in danger --  lightning hits, a kidnapping, pratfalls, a Miss Piggy "punch-out" -- all exaggerated and meant to be funny rather than scary.

batteries not included film stillOctober 10-12: BATTERIES NOT INCLUDED (rated PG, 80 mins.)
Hume Cronyn and Jessica Tandy are among the impoverished residents of a slum tenement threatened with demolition by evil land developers. Only a miracle can save Cronyn, Tandy, and their friends -- and that miracle manifests itself in the form of a "family" of extraterrestrial flying saucers, who need the electricity provided by the tenement to survive. The grateful humanized spaceships repay their earthbound hosts by doing battle with the villains' henchmen. When the building is engulfed in flames, all seems lost, but the aliens have a few more tricks up their metallic sleeves.
Parents need to know that this film's overall content is very mild. However, there are some scenes of violence. One includes an arsonist burning down an apartment building. Another scene shows characters threatening others with axes and baseball bats. This film clearly depicts characters as either good or bad. Even young children will recognize what behavior is acceptable.





TVCLUB


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FARGO
Tuesdays at 10PM
free admission; concessions encouraged
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ROCK AND REEL


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