Aperture Cinema - Winston-Salem
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311 west fourth st.winston salem nc          tel. 336-722-8148
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ongoing series


 

NIGHT SHIFT


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sponsored by:

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old or new, classy or cult, scary or camp- films to stay up late for...

All tickets just $5- bring five of your friends, and you get in FREE!
Click here to visit (and "like") our Night Shift Facebook page!
sixteen candles still1SIXTEEN CANDLES
Friday, February 6 @ 9:30PM
Saturday, February 7 @ 10:30PM
Sunday, February 8 @ 9:30PM

On the eve of her sister's wedding, suburban teenager Samantha (Molly Ringwald) suffers silently as her family forgets her birthday. Even worse, some total dork (Anthony Michael Hall) keeps propositioning her with sophomoric innuendo when she really craves romantic attention from high-school hunk Jake (Michael Schoeffling). Moving from Samantha's family home as it's invaded by outre relatives to a high-school dance where nothing seems to go her way, this bittersweet teen comedy traces the hopes and disappointments of not only Samantha, but also a host of incidental but memorable characters, from a hapless Japanese exchange student to a prom queen and a posse of barely pubescent nerds. A climactic party scene at which these various strata of young America overcome their rigid hierarchies sets the stage for resolutions both tender and torrid.

clueless still1CLUELESS
Friday, February 20 @ 9:30PM
Saturday, February 21 @ 10:30PM
Sunday, February 22 @ 9:30PM
Jane Austen might never have imagined that her 1816 novel Emma could be turned into a fresh and satirical look at ultra-rich teenagers in a Beverly Hills high school. Cher (Alicia Silverstone) and Dionne (Stacey Dash), both named after "great singers of the past that now do infomercials," are pampered upper-class girls who care less about getting good grades than wearing the right clothes and being as popular as possible. But Cher, who lives with her tough yet warm-hearted lawyer dad (Dan Hedaya) and hunky, sensitive stepbrother (Paul Rudd), also has an innate urge to help those less fortunate -- like the two introverted teachers she brings together ("negotiating" herself improved grades in the process) and new friend Tai (Brittany Murphy), who starts out a geek and ends up a Cher prodigy. Cher also possesses her own sensitive side, and she is looking for the perfect boyfriend, whom she ends up finding where she least expected.

KIDS AT HEART


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Kids at Heart is a/perture’s family-friendly film series, and a great opportunity for parents to share some of the films they themselves enjoyed as children with a new generation of film-goers!

We've also included advisory content information below (courtesy of Common Sense Media), so parents can determine what age is best suited to each film!

Screening times:

Fridays- 4:00pm
Saturdays- 10:00am
Sundays- 10:00am 

Film Schedule:

babe film still1January 30-February 1: BABE (rated G, 91mins.)

A young pig fights convention to become a sheep dog -- or, rather, sheep pig -- in this charming Australian family film, which became an unexpected international success due to superior special effects and an intelligent script. The title refers to the name bestowed on a piglet soon after his separation from his family, when he finds himself on a strange farm. Confused and sad, Babe is adopted by a friendly dog and slowly adjusts to his new home. Discovering that the fate of most pigs is the dinner table, Babe devotes himself to becoming a useful member of the farm by trying to learn how to herd sheep, despite the skepticism of the other animals and the kindly but conventional Farmer Hoggett (James Cromwell). Because technically impeccable animatronics and computer graphics allow the farm animals to converse easily among themselves, first-time director Chris Noonan can treat the film's menagerie as actual characters, playing scene not for cuteness but for real emotions. The result is often surprisingly touching, with Noonan and George Miller's script, based on Dick King-Smith's children's book and, indirectly, a true story, seamlessly combining gentle whimsy and sincere feeling. These same qualities are embodied by in Cromwell's beautifully understated performance as Farmer Hoggett, which anchors the film. Despite its unlikely premise and low profile, Babe's inspirational story was embraced by audiences and critics, and the movie became an international sleeper that won an Academy Award nomination for Best Picture.
Parents need to know that this live-action farm tale is widely considered one of the best family films of all time. However, unlike animated films, in which violence can be dismissed as make-believe, some of the violence on the farm may frighten younger viewers. One scene, in which wild dogs attack the sheep and kill one, is particularly intense and disturbing. The reality of why animals are bred is mentioned again and again (Christmas is equated to a blood bath, because of all the animals slaughtered to end up on a dinner table). But at its core, this is a tale of perseverance, friendship, and making your dreams come true.

princess bride film still1February 13-15: THE PRINCESS BRIDE (rated G, 91mins.)
Robin Wright and Cary Elwes star in this fairytale adventure about a beautiful princess and the gallant hero who rescues her from an evil villain. Directed by Rob Reiner, it's an enchanting classic the whole family will love!.
Parents need to know that this quirky, funny fairy tale has quite a bit of action-style violence, including a torture machine, sword fights (one to the death), a death by poisoning, quicksand, fire pits, and ROUSes (rodents of unusual size) and giant shrieking eels that attack main characters. But the movie's skewed humor and its storybook feel lessen some of the impact of the violent scenes. There's also some drinking -- in one scene a drunken character is revived in a barrel of water -- and a bit of kissing.

muppet movie film still1February 27-March 1: THE MUPPET MOVIE (rated G, 98mins.)
Kermit the Frog is persuaded by agent Dom DeLuise to pursue a career in Hollywood. Along the way, Kermit picks up Fozzie Bear, Miss Piggy, Gonzo, and a motley crew of other Muppets with similar aspirations. Meanwhile, Kermit must elude the grasp of a frog-leg restaurant magnate.
Parents need to know that this Muppet movie is a pretty likeable road trip romp with singable songs, but with some guns and slapstick violence. Throughout the movie Kermit is being pursued by men with guns and a couple shots are fired. Miss Piggy and Kermit are captured, Kermit almost gets his "brains scrambled" in a crazy electrical machine, and there's a final stand-off with guns drawn. But the Muppets always get away from the bad guys in a fun way (thanks to Miss Piggy's karate chops). There's some drinking -- Miss Piggy and Kermit drink wine with straws -- and minor characters smoke cigars.

ROCK AND REEL

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 More titles coming soon!

 
 

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